Tilcon Connecticut

logoTilconCTTilcon Connecticut is an award-winning, leading supplier of quality crushed stone, hot mix asphalt and ready mix concrete. They also provide heavy and highway construction and paving services for state/local road, bridge and highway projects. In addition, they have a barge transportation division that delivers stone.

Tilcon1

History
It all started with one steam shovel...”
1923
Italian immigrant Angelo Tomasso, Sr. established Angelo Tomasso Inc. construction company and began by building roads and sewer projects.
1930s-1940s
Paved the majority of roads in New Britain, erected the company’s first hot mix asphalt plan and acquired a quarry.
1950s-1970s
After Tomasso died in 1952, his son Angelo Tomasso, Jr. became president and CEO. Continued growth, expansion and acquisitions of  asphalt plants, concrete plants and quarries in Connecticut.
1972  Ashland Resources Company (a division of Ashland Oil Inc.) purchases Angelo Tomasso Inc. with management still being run by the Tomasso family.
1979 International ownership – Thomas Tilling Ltd. (UK) acquired Ashland Oil’s northeast regional construction group, making Angelo Tomasso Inc. a division of Tilling subsidiary Tilcon Inc.
1984 Company acquisition by British Tire and Rubber Co.
1990 Tilcon Tomasso’s name changed to Tilcon-Connecticut, and Angelo Tomasso, Jr., was appointed chairman of Tilcon Inc.
1996 CRH Group plc.-purchases Tilcon.
2001 Angelo Tomasso, Jr., retired as Tilcon Inc.’s chairman.  President and CEO Joseph Abate, and his nephew, Carmine Abate, became president and CEO of Tilcon-Connecticut.
2000s  Tilcon recognized by the industry with numerous awards, including a Quality in Construction, Commitment to Environmental Excellence and Showplace Award.
2005 Carmine Abate named president of Tilcon Connecticut.
2006-present Continued growth and market leadership in the northeastern United States

Services
Paving Services
Heavy & Highway Construction
Barge Transportation
Rail Services

Products
Crushed Stone
Hot Mix Asphalt
Ready Mix Concrete

Projects include:
Crushed stone
Hot Mix Asphalt
Ready Mix Concrete
Paving Services
Heavy & Highway Construction
Barge Transportation Services

tilconbarge

Interested in working for us?

Find out about openings, benefits and more here:
Careers at Tilcon

Contact Us:
P.O. Box 1357
642 Black Rock Ave.
New Britain, CT 06050
860-224-6010
http://www.tilconct.com/

 About Oldcastle (our parent company)
Oldcastle is North America’s largest manufacturer of building products and materials. With more than 2,000 locations throughout North America, we are in constant pursuit of the next generation of successful decision makers, leaders and problem solvers. Learn more about joining the Oldcastle team HERE.

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Samantha Streb, Staffing Administrative Manager

SAM_3680What do you do in your position?

I manage the administrative support/office management function of the staffing center.

What year did you start?

2013

 

Where is your job located?

Rochester, NY

What do you like about working here?

I work with great people – not just in our office, but throughout the entire corporation.

What are the best parts of your job?

The people I work with and getting to help others.

Why do you think Oldcastle is a good place to work?

Oldcastle is a good place to work because they are always looking for ways to improve the business, and are open to suggestions from any level.

Sam, second from left, touring the new hockey arena at R.I.T.

How would your coworkers describe you?

Tall, just like Nick.

What are your hobbies outside of work?

Exercising, decorating, planning events and trying new restaurants.

If you would like, tell us about your family.

I have been married for almost 2 years to my husband Jay, who is an architect.

Just for fun, we want to know – what was your first job ever?

Camp Counselor for the Town of Greece.

 

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Oldcastle is North America’s largest manufacturer of building products and materials. With more than 2,000 locations throughout North America, we are in constant pursuit of the next generation of successful decision makers, leaders and problem solvers. Learn more about joining the Oldcastle team HERE.

Follow us on FacebookTwitterGoogle+Pinterest, and LinkedIn!

© OldcastleCareers, 2014.

 

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What Recruiters Really Look For When Checking Your References

careerladder By the time you’re asked for references, you’re probably feeling pretty good. You may even pat yourself on the back and say “I got this!” It IS a good sign when you’re asked to provide references, but don’t go changing your LinkedIn or Facebook profile to that new job title just yet. Here are a few guidelines and red flags to watch out for.

Think twice about listing peers
Pick a boss, manager or superior to be your reference. If you were a manager or in another supervisory role, avoid picking direct reports as references. Ideally, aim to have at least 2 of your 3 references be people you reported to directly.

Choose Wisely
Always pick people who will speak highly, yet honestly, about you.  An overly complimentary reference can be just as bad as a negative one. Experienced hiring managers can tell when references are exaggerating or giving them fluff answers instead of real facts and opinions about a person. No one is expecting you to be perfect. We all have strengths and weaknesses.  The purpose of the reference checking process is to find out if you are who you say you are, if your resume reflects your true skills and if you would be a good fit for the organization.

Prep your references beforehand
It sounds really bad to a recruiter when they call someone who seems surprised to be contacted. Even worse, some references have even blurted out “I’m not sure why I was even asked to be a reference.” Oops. You can avoid this scenario by keeping your references in the loop and giving them a heads up that they’re going to get a call. Even better, provide them with a copy of your resume, tell them a little bit about the position you’re applying for and give them a few reminders about which skills you’re hoping they can emphasize. You don’t want them to sound scripted, but it can help to refresh their memory on your background, especially if you have not seen or worked with the person for awhile.

Don’t Hand In Your References Too Early
Wait until you’re asked! Our recruiters ask for the names of 3 past managers, even if we were already given a pre-prepared list.

We want to see how well a candidate stays connected to past management after they leave. Good employees have a network from past jobs and companies that they can rely on. Mediocre or weak candidates often leave companies on bad terms and don’t have the same network.” – Chris Garrie, VP of Recruiting

Leave References Off Your Resume
Use the space at the bottom of your resume for more important information. If you have them on there, recruiters are already evaluating who you listed. Everything you say, do or write during the application and interview process is a clue. Make sure these clues play to your advantage.

The Red Flags

  1. Weak references. These include personal friends, professors (if you have been out of college more than a few years), ministers/pastors, parents and in-laws. Yes, we have seen it all.
  2. What Your Reference Says Is Just As Important As What They Don’t. If your reference sounds rehearsed or like they are withholding information, our radar goes up.
  3. Suspicious Answers To The Hard Questions.  Long pauses and being too careful with responses or being too complimentary are very telling to a hiring manager.

“If the person on the other end of the line is not providing much information or seems frustrated, it’s a good sign that they aren’t interested in talking about the person, no matter what they are actually saying. People are cordial and upbeat when they’re doing a favor for someone they truly like. They are short and curt if they’re talking about someone they don’t.” – Rob Mischler, Staffing Manager

Reference checking is a way to find out what motivates someone, what type of employee they are and how likely they are to fit in, produce and stay at their potential new place of employment. While every hiring manager or recruiter has their own method for handling references, it’s better to err on the side of caution and make sure you pick the right references and prep them properly. Do this and you will increase the odds of landing that job!

Bonus tip: Encourage your references to respond to that initial call as soon as possible. We’re not expecting them to answer the call on the spot, but if we don’t hear back within a few days, that can be a bad sign.

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Oldcastle is North America’s largest manufacturer of building products and materials. With more than 2,000 locations throughout North America, we are in constant pursuit of the next generation of successful decision makers, leaders and problem solvers. Learn more about joining the Oldcastle team HERE. © OldcastleCareers, 2014

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  5 Must-Ask Interview Questions

Interviewing is not a one-way street. Ask questions!

Good interviews involve a give and take. The conversation should not be one-sided. These questions will help you gather information to discover if the position is truly a good fit.

1)  Why is the position open?
It’s important to find out why an opening exists. Is it a new position? If not, it’s perfectly reasonable to inquire about the history behind the availability. Pay particular attention to the interviewer’s body language and what they say when they respond. Did they hesitate or seem guarded? You won’t always be told the entire or real reason for a previous person’s departure, but it’s still important to inquire.

2)  What do people enjoy most about working here?
This is a great question because it shows you already classify the company as a good place to work. It also makes the interviewer dig deeper to share employee opinions/perceptions, giving you a clue about the company culture. Remember, the future employer has to sell you on the position as well. It’s not a one-way street!

3)  What are the next steps in the process?
This question shows that you are interested, organized and ready to move forward with this company.

4)  Is there anything else you need to know about me that will assist in your decision to fill this role?
You can phrase this question in a number of ways, but the main goal here is to find out what else they may be looking for that you may not have addressed during the interview.

5)   Do you know when you will be making your decision?
In the best case scenario, you’ll find out a firm date or at least a general time frame for hiring.

Interviewers don’t expect to be the only ones asking the questions. Targeted, well-thought out questions not only show you’re engaged and interested, but they’re also very important in gathering the information you need to decide if this is the right job for you.

What questions do you ask in an interview? Let us know. We would love to find out and share with other job seekers.

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Oldcastle is North America’s largest manufacturer of building products and materials. With more than 2,000 locations throughout North America, we are in constant pursuit of the next generation of successful decision makers, leaders and problem solvers. Learn more about joining the Oldcastle team HERE. © OldcastleCareers, 2014

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Rob Mischler, Staffing Manager, Oldcastle Materials

At our corporate headquarters in Atlanta

What do you do in your position?

I provide exempt-level staffing assistance for a number of the divisions within the Oldcastle Materials Group. I partner with the HR Management and Hiring Managers to identify talent, facilitate a consistent offer process and ensure a strong candidate experience overall.

How long have you worked for Oldcastle?

Since 2013

Where is your job located?

Rochester, NY

What do you like about working here?

The people! We have an outstanding team here in Rochester that is constantly evolving. I also enjoy the opportunity we have to make a significant and long term impact on the business.

What are the best parts of your job?

The reward of creating opportunities for others and building relationships internally.

Why do you think Oldcastle is a good place to work?

There is a strong focus on individual development and creating a path for advancement.

How would your coworkers describe you?

Hmmm… I’d guess they would say I’m a person who is always upbeat, smiling and wanting to help – if you can get me out of my office.

Pre-run, Chase Corporate Challenge 2014

What are your hobbies outside of work?

Trail running (lots of it), and anything my son Chase may be interested in doing with me.

Would you like to share anything about your family?

I have been married for 11 years to Emily (who I met in college). We have a 7-year old son named Chase and a golden retriever named Tank.

Just for fun, we want to know – what was your first job ever?

I worked for a family-run pizza shop during the Summer (from the age of 15 to 21). My mom never had to worry about us going hungry!

Do you have any funny or interesting work stories to share?

I do have one from my first job. One time,  I was very engaged in conversation and was shaking an Italian dressing bottle. What  I didn’t realize was that I sprayed oil onto the whole line of customers. It was an expensive dry cleaning bill!

 

taglineOldcastle

Oldcastle is North America’s largest manufacturer of building products and materials. With more than 2,000 locations throughout North America, we are in constant pursuit of the next generation of successful decision makers, leaders and problem solvers. Learn more about joining the Oldcastle team HERE.

Follow us on FacebookTwitterGoogle+Pinterest, and LinkedIn!

© OldcastleCareers, 2014.

 

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Meadow Burke

tiltupmeadowburkeMeadow Burke has been engineering, designing, manufacturing and distributing concrete accessories for the concrete construction industry for nearly eight decades. Their range of products include precast products, tilt-up equipment, forming, reinforcing, and road and bridge concrete accessories. They have 400 employees and 12 locations across the United States.

distributingmeadowburkeMeadow Burke engineers work with architects, project managers and concrete contractors to provide product and application support. They select the proper anchors, snap ties, rebar supports, bracing and more. Engineers determine anchor placement, calculate safe work values, and assist with rigging. Most of Meadow Burke’s engineered lifting systems are American-made with U.S. steel and are field-tested to the highest quality standards. Through their concrete accessories, they help create and maintain safer work environments, improve construction times, and reduce costs for concrete contractors across North America.

precastmeadowburke

Besides manufacturing and developing accessories for the concrete construction industry, Meadow Burke has developed over 50 patented products. In addition, they are a proud partner of the Lone Survivor Foundation. This organization supports military members by helping them rehabilitate and recover after they have served.

Meadow Burke manufactures high quality concrete products for:

formingmeadowburke

meadowburkelogo

Locations: Georgia, North Carolina, Arizona, Virginia, California, Illinois, Pennsylvania, Ohio, New Jersey, Washington, Florida and Texas
Operations include administration/engineering, service centers, manufacturing and warehouse/shipping.

Interested in working for us?
Find out about openings, benefits and more here:

Careers at Meadow Burke
meadowburke
Contact us:
2835 Overpass Road
Tampa, FL 33619
(813) 248-1944
(877) 518-7665
http://meadowburke.com/

Oldcastle is North America’s largest manufacturer of building products and materials. With more than 2,000 locations throughout North America, we are in constant pursuit of the next generation of successful decision makers, leaders and problem solvers. Learn more about joining the Oldcastle team HERE.

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Can We Talk? Twitter Career Chats – Join The Conversation

birdWant to know more about a certain career field or job?  Have a cover letter, resume or interview question?  Twitter chats are an easy, low key way to get your questions answered, get involved AND get your name out there. You never know who might be participating. Not only that, career chats can be fun!  It’s easy to jump right in.

How it works
Chats are centered around a common interest, theme or topic and take place at a set time and date. Many last for about an hour. Typically, a moderator starts off the conversation with questions and explains the format for the answers. You can respond with your answer or just follow along without responding to see what everyone else is saying. Below are two screenshots with tweets from the moderator.

format format2

As you can see in the third screen shot (below), the moderator (OpenMicCareerChat) asked a question related to the theme for that week’s chat. The theme was salary negotiation.

 OMCchatquestion

Here’s a tweet in response:

OMCchat

Don’t forget to use the hashtag (in the examples above, it’s #OMCchat) so everyone can see your reply.   You don’t have to answer every question, and can hop off the chat anytime you want. Depending on the chat, you’ll find a wide variety of people who participate, including career experts, job seekers, recruiters, college career center staff, company recruiters and more. The beauty of the chat is that everyone’s input is welcomed. The goal is to get a conversation going and learn from each other.

There are many ways you can follow a chat. You can follow along and participate using Twitter, use TweetChat or HootSuite or use the chat hashtag in the Twitter search box to see new replies as they come in.  It’s a bit hard to see below, but in this case, we typed #jobhuntchat in the search bar. Click “All” to see the most recent tweets. It will continue to refresh with new tweets as they come in.

jobhuntchat

 

During the chat
People will be tweeting, replying to tweets, re-tweeting and “favoriting.” Once you feel comfortable, feel free to do the same. You may encounter a few side conversations, greetings and introductions as well.

After the chat
Follow up by following any of the people who sparked your interest during the chat.  This is a great way to connect and network.

Can’t make the chat or felt like it went by too fast?
Chats can move at a very quick pace. In the beginning, you may feel like you missed out. Not to worry! You can always go back and search the chat hashtag again to take a look at the discussion that took place. This is also a good thing to do if you want to research the chat BEFORE you take part in it. Look at the previous chat session. Again, to do this – simply type the hashtag in the search bar. It’s a good idea to observe the chat first, just to get an idea of how things flow.

Tips
Conversations move quickly, with people retweeting answers that resonate with them, as well as giving their own answers. Some chats are more informal and free flowing than others. Observe and participate in a few to see which are the best fit for you.

Chats To Check Out:
#internpro,
Great for young people just entering the workforce.
Topics: internships, networking, interviewing & more. Monday at 9 pm EST, Moderator: @YouTern
#jobhuntchat, Monday at 10 p.m. EST  Various moderators including @Blogging4jobs
#tchat (workplace “hot topics” from hr and recruiting to career management) Wednesday at 7 pm  various moderators: @TalentCulture
#CareerServChat (dedicated to engaging college students and graduates in the career development process and answering career and job related questions)
Thursdays, 9 PM, EST. Moderators @ChaimShapiro, @CareerDrEliz, @RichCareer, @E_fields
#OMCchat (OpenMicCareerChat) Fridays, 12:00 PM, EST
Moderators: @CyndyTrivella, @TomBolt & @LevyRecruits

Where to find more chats in your industry/field?
Here’s a great place to start: http://tweetreports.com/resources/twitter-chats-list/

Career chats on Twitter can be a good way to make new connections, learn answers to your career related questions, get suggestions for your job search and promote yourself. Give one or two chats a try and let us know what you think!

 

taglineOldcastle

Oldcastle is North America’s largest manufacturer of building products and materials. With more than 2,000 locations throughout North America, we are in constant pursuit of the next generation of successful decision makers, leaders and problem solvers. Learn more about joining the Oldcastle team HERE.

Follow us on FacebookTwitterGoogle+Pinterest, and LinkedIn!

© OldcastleCareers, 2014

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Nick Ragone, Corporate Recruiter, Oldcastle Precast

nickragoneWhat do you do in your position?

I partner with Precast to recruit, interview and hire professionals for our precast facilities nationwide.

How long have you worked for Oldcastle?

Since 2012

Where is your job located?

Rochester, NY

 

What do you like about working here?

Oldcastle is a huge company, but when you get down to the local sites, there is a small company, almost entrepreneurial feel to it. The people are great and very down to earth.

What are the best parts of your job?

The free cake! Seriously, nothing beats when you know that you have found a good job/career match for someone.

nickr

Nick touring a precast site

Why do you think Oldcastle is a good place to work?

Oldcastle has a progressive, forward-thinking management philosophy. That’s not always an expectation of a construction materials company, but it really holds true here. We also have an excellent career development program that promotes career growth in all areas of the company.

How would your coworkers describe you?

Very tall.

Do you have any funny or interesting work stories to share?

As a lifelong Yankee’s fan, I always like to point out that our Precast division played a part in building out the infrastructure of the new Yankee stadium. Granted, it was for the underground drainage system for one of the adjoining parking garages, but it was still an integral part of the construction project.

What are your hobbies outside of work?

Spending time with family, playing golf, and anything related to watching or following Syracuse  University basketball.

Would you like to share anything about your family?

My wife and I have been married for almost 12 years now and have two children – an 8-year old daughter and 5-year old son. When my kids grow up, my daughter wants to be a fashion designer and live in Paris and my son wants to be the Incredible Hulk.

Just for fun, we want to know – what was your first job ever?

I’m proud to say that I made a run for the border…Taco Bell!

Is there anything else you would like to add?

Don’t underestimate the importance of proper grammar and spelling when writing your resume/cover letter.

 

taglineOldcastle

Oldcastle is North America’s largest manufacturer of building products and materials. With more than 2,000 locations throughout North America, we are in constant pursuit of the next generation of successful decision makers, leaders and problem solvers. Learn more about joining the Oldcastle team HERE.

Follow us on FacebookTwitterGoogle+Pinterest, and LinkedIn!

© OldcastleCareers, 2014.

 

 

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What Walter White Can Teach You About Evaluating A Job Offer

Yes, the show is over, and what a show it was! Whether you watched Breaking Bad or not, there are lessons that can be learned from our fictional friend. Before accepting an offer, keep Walter White in mind. Start by evaluating the basics.

ENVIRONMENT
Is it basic, yet provides you with the tools necessary to succeed? Or, is it high-end with extravagant tools that are overboard for what is necessary? What about a virtual position that allows you to work from home – is that right for you and your family life? Sometimes, it’s not advantageous to work from home. I guess it depends what you do. Walt knew enough to not bring his work home, until eventually it followed him.

CO-WORKERS
Just ask Walt… The people you work with every day can have a huge impact on your happiness and productivity while at work. Find out if your potential co-workers are knowledgeable and dependable. Hint: look up their experience on sites like LinkedIn.com. Having stable and knowledgeable co-workers can make a huge difference in your happiness and survival (literal and figurative).

SALARY
Salary is often a top consideration. Like Walt, understand what it is you are looking for in a new job. How much do you need to pay the bills and have some left over? Is a little extra salary worth the “extras” that brings? Sometimes it is and other times it is not. Does more salary mean less time away from your family? Does it mean doing things that are out of your skill sets and comfort zone? Does it really put you in a better place (long term)? Check out sites like monster.salary.com to do a little salary research.

ADVANCEMENT OPPORTUNITIES
What are you looking to accomplish in your career? How fast do you want to advance? Are you looking for an opportunity that provides advancement? Are you at a point in your career where you want to be the “kingpin” of an organization? Look at the size of the organization. Can you advance to the level you desire or do you need to wait until someone retires or, in Walt’s world, is “terminated”?

WORK/LIFE BALANCE
Research the company’s work/life balance. If this is important to you, take this into consideration to better ensure that it’s a good fit. Walt went from a job with great work/life balance as a teacher into a career that demanded long hours, off hours and he needed to be on call for emergency situations. Walt made the decision that work/life balance wasn’t as important as the extra money his new opportunity provided. So, at that time, it was worth it for him. Consider whether it is worth it for you. You can check out a site like Glassdoor.com to read reviews from employees. Just remember that sometimes, those comments are from employees as disgruntled as Walt.

BENEFITS
Are benefits important to you? Unless your spouse carries them, they probably are very important. Unless you can put yourself in a situation like Walt, and pay for your health care needs with cash, make sure you vet out available benefits and the cost. Most jobs don’t pay like Walt’s second career, so cash isn’t typically an option. When you look at salary and are comparing one company’s offer to another, be sure to take benefits into consideration. What is the cost of health insurance? What does it cover? What are the deductibles? Is there a 401k match? What are the paid holidays? What is the Paid Time Off (PTO) policy? What is the dress code? Most company websites contain some kind of a benefits section that will give you an idea of what is offered.

Every career decision you make has its pros and cons.  To minimize the risks and maximize the rewards, make sure to evaluate all of the above. Walter had his reasons for choosing the career path he followed and so do you.

coreyGuest blogger and Breaking Bad fan Corey Listar is a Staffing Manager for the Oldcastle Recruiting team in Rochester, NY. He has a Masters degree in Career & Human Resource Development and over 15 years of experience in staffing, recruiting and human resources.

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Oldcastle is North America’s largest manufacturer of building products and materials. With more than 2,000 locations throughout North America, we are in constant pursuit of the next generation of successful decision makers, leaders and problem solvers. Learn more about joining the Oldcastle team HERE.

© OldcastleCareers 2014

 

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Running Your Career – 8 Tips From The Track

GET READY, GET SET, GO!

You don’t have to be a runner to learn lessons from the sport.  Learn how to plan, pace and push yourself professionally.

1) Be prepared
Prior to a race, you want to find out what you can about the course. Is it flat or hilly? For a job, you want to find out what you can about the company. Check out their web page and social media presence. Have they been in the news? If it’s a public company, do some research to see how the business is doing. Don’t forget LinkedIn to see if you know anyone who works there.

2) Do not deviate from your normal routine
In running, experts caution against eating a different breakfast, breaking in new shoes or wearing a new t-shirt the day of the race. Similar advice holds true for your professional life, especially when you first start a job. You were hired for a particular position because you showcased your skills and personality in a way that matched that company culture. Acting or dressing differently than you presented yourself during the interview process could cause problems in fitting in.

3) Reserve your energy
New runners tend to start out too fast. Huge mistake! No one wants to be that runner who ends up walking after the first quarter mile.  In your career, you want to show enthusiasm and dedication, but not at the expense of your colleagues. Pace yourself. You don’t have to take on every project. If you spread yourself too thin, you’ll be too tired and worn out to give the tasks at hand the attention they deserve.

4) It’s a marathon, not a sprint
Ok, it may be just a 5k, but remember – it takes time to get those miles in. Just like in your career, you’re in it for the long haul. It’s doubtful you’re going to beat any records in your first race. You have to see what the experience is like, how you can improve and what you need to change before the next one. The same holds true in your job. Start out strong, but don’t get ahead of yourself. You need to experience the culture, personalities and workload to really see how you fit in and can thrive.

5) Set Goals, Reevaluate & Improve
After people run their first race, they often get bit by the running “bug” and sign up for their second one. However, running faster is not a given. It takes a plan, practice and commitment.   The same path holds true in the working world. Is there a mentor you can talk to during the course of your career? Seeking out advice from long time employees, your boss and other experienced colleagues can help with your own goal setting and improvement. Where do you want to be in 5 years? Write those goals down and start working towards them.

6) Continue Learning
There will always be new races to run, different distances to try and new workouts to experience. New running enthusiasts often seek advice from more experienced runners. They subscribe to running publications, join running groups and associate with other runners.  In the work world, you should  join associations, attend industry specific events and keep current on news relevant to your occupation. This will keep you competitive and help to alleviate burnout and boredom down the line.

7) Break Through Your Comfort Zone
Runners who want to improve have to push themselves. They may not want to run intervals or run in inclement weather conditions, but they do, knowing they will get better. No one can guarantee what race day will be like, just like no one can guarantee exactly how your career path will progress. However, you can control your choices to some extent, especially when it comes to personal development. Take on challenges that make you uncomfortable at first. Not a public speaker? Practice so you can present that speech anyway! Wary of learning an unfamiliar software? Make a concerted effort and set up a schedule to do so. Rewards involve risk. Take a chance – the important thing is to at least try and put yourself out there.

8) Don’t Get Discouraged
The truth is – not every run is going to be a good one. Not every work day is going to be your best day ever. New runners are often told to remember: “No matter how slow you’re going, you’re still lapping everyone on the couch.”  The same philosophy holds true for your work life. Acknowledge that growing your career takes time. Your pace and progress is just that – yours. Stop comparing yourself to other people, continue to work towards your goals and enjoy the journey along the way!

taglineOldcastle

Oldcastle is North America’s largest manufacturer of building products and materials. With more than 2,000 locations throughout North America, we are in constant pursuit of the next generation of successful decision makers, leaders and problem solvers. Learn more about joining the Oldcastle team HERE.

Follow us on FacebookTwitterGoogle+Pinterest, and LinkedIn!

© OldcastleCareers 2014

 

 

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