Joe Bianchi, Corporate Recruiter, Oldcastle Materials

06-28-2015-Jenn 047What do you do in your position at Oldcastle?
I work on the Oldcastle’s Materials Team and recruit for their Southeast Division.  The Southeast Division consists of APAC Mississippi, Conrad Yelvington, MidSouth Paving and Preferred Materials (located in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, and Tennessee).  I recruit for all exempt level positions within the Southeast. These roles could include Paving Foreman, Superintendents, Project Managers, Estimators, Ready Mix Sales, Plant Foreman as well as Corporate Staff positions.

When did you join Oldcastle?
February, 2015

Where is your job located?
Rochester, NY

What do you like about working here?
Oldcastle is a great place to work.  Since I have been here, it seems to be in continuous growth mode, and you really feel like you’re helping the organization by finding quality people to help continue its growth. I enjoy the culture, and like working for an organization that promotes getting the job done as well as career development opportunities for its employees.

What are the best parts of your job?
My co-workers.  They are always quick to help or give guidance when needed.  I enjoy coming in and working with them every day.  Next, the relationships that I built with the Hiring Managers, Human Resources and others who work in the Southeast.  Even though I work from a distance, I still feel like I’m part of their team. In addition, I enjoy getting to meet all the great candidates that we come in contact with.  I get to know our candidates very well through the process, and try to stay in touch even after they are hired.  For those who haven’t been hired yet, I take it upon myself to try and help to find the right fit for them.  It’s always a great feeling when you know that you did the right thing for someone and they are able to advance their career.

Jenn 11-16-2014 037What would your co-workers say about you?
I think they view me as a very big family guy. If I am not going to a baseball game, I am usually at a family dinner, birthday party or just getting together for a visit.  There are not many nights that I go straight home.  They probably would also say that I am very organized.  If you see my desk, everything has a place. My motto is – the less paper, the better!

Do you have any funny or interesting work stories to share?
I have too many to share, but here’s one: I used to work at Buckman’s Carwash in high school.  One day, I was asked to play the role of a dentist and was given a hammer and pencil.  The thought was that, since I played baseball, I would be the most qualified to hit the eraser on the pencil with the hammer and extract a loose tooth.  I accepted the challenge and the tooth was removed.  What I failed to mention prior, was that I was pitcher.

Just for fun, we want to know – what was your first job ever?
My first job ever was as a dishwasher at a Greek restaurant called Emerald’s.  My friend Traffy got me and all of our buddies a job there for the summer.

2012-RCBLChampionshipDo you have any hobbies?
I love anything baseball (NY Mets), football (Buffalo Bills), working in the yard, and for those who know me…vacuuming. When I’m not at the office, I help to run the Rochester Collegiate Baseball League with two of my good friends, Dan Sullivan and Lou Izzo. The “RCBL” is a local (Rochester, NY) league built for college players to develop and play competitive baseball during the summer. In addition, we also run a High School League in August which is modeled after our college league. www.rochestercbl.com.

JBDaughterTell us about your family.
My wife Jennifer and I have a lively 4 year old daughter, Faith, and a clueless 5 year old black lab named Smuckers at home. We are also expecting our second child in early September. Jenn and I both come from very large and very close families. With 11 nieces and nephews on both sides and with #12 showing up any day now, our nights and weekends are typically filled with some type of family event. And not only are we close with both sides of the family, but both sides are close with each other. It’s not unusual to hear that my parents and in-laws were up until 3 am playing cards together on a Saturday night…and we weren’t even invited!
11-16-2014 149Jenn 11-16-2014 064image (9)

Connect with me on LinkedIn: Joe Bianchi

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Oldcastle is North America’s largest manufacturer of building products and materials. With more than 2,000 locations throughout North America, we are in constant pursuit of the next generation of successful decision makers, leaders and problem solvers. Learn more about joining the Oldcastle team HERE.

Follow us on TwitterInstagramLinkedInYouTube, and Facebook for jobs and career advice. And, don’t forget to join our NEW Talent Community to receive a monthly e-mail newsletter with expert advice on the job search process.

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Light at the end of a layoff – 5 life lessons learned

tunnel

Have you ever experienced a layoff? Did it make you stronger? Sometimes, it can help to hear what others have gone through to know that you are not alone. Below, one of the members of our recruiting office shares her story and insights that may help you as a job seeker, even if you’ve never experienced a lay off.

“Back in 2000, I finally got the courage to go for what I thought was my dream job – as a copywriter at a web development firm. At first, it was. They had cool clients like Jolt Cola (which meant FREE, super caffeinated soda for all employees), creative people to work with, a modern office with up-to-date equipment, higher salaries and stock options. Nine months later, as the dot.com boom crashed, 20% of us were let go – most in the marketing department. The company had hired too many people (and kept on hiring) without enough clients. The stock options I negotiated – worthless. My fun, new job? Gone in what seemed like an instant. It was a crushing blow. 

Two months later, I landed a contract job as a communications specialist for a global telecommunications firm. It wasn’t my ideal gig, but, if it went permanent, would lead to a 20% bump in pay. Unfortunately, three months later, all contracts were let go. At that point, I was just numb – here we go again! I actually felt worse for the non contract employees at the same company who I knew would be losing their jobs within that next year. 

Don’t get me wrong, I never want to be laid off again. But, being laid off did teach me valuable life lessons that I still carry with me to this day:” 

1) The Grass is not always greener
Before being laid off in 2001, I worked at a not for profit. Back then, I bemoaned the lower pay and lack of more exciting clients. However, more excitement, “cool clients” and other superficial perks don’t mean a thing when you’re out of a job. At the time, I was so eager to start a new job that I ignored red flags. Taking a new job is always a risk. Don’t let your excitement to jump ship cloud your judgment.

2) Having a 6 month emergency fund is not optional
During my brief period of unemployment, money was tight. I got very little severance from the web firm and none from the contract job. Between those two layoffs, I was only out of work for about four months. Even with unemployment (which, let’s be real, is not much), it was rough. Start off by saving fifty bucks a month if you have to – whatever it takes to have cash on hand for the unexpected. You really will need that cushion.

3) Keep your network growing – not just when you’re out of work
LinkedIn, Facebook and other social media didn’t even exist in 2001. All I had was email to keep in touch with my other unemployed colleagues. I also met up with people face-to-face. You can’t always hide behind a computer screen. Force yourself to get out there. Networking is not just for when you lose your job. By keeping a healthy network, those people will be there when you need them the most. Remember, it’s a give and take, so be willing to help them out as well.

4) Pay vs Potential – keep an open mind
When I saw a job for a freelance copywriter at a catalog company in our local circular, I was skeptical and dismissive. Why bother? It’s only part time, no benefits and who is even advertising jobs in such a small paper anyway? I decided to take a chance and send in my resume. I was called in, met with the owners, explained that I was looking for full time (with benefits!) and proved my case by taking home products that day to write about – as a test. They hired me as a full time contractor – at a rate that was $3/hour LESS than what I had been making at the contract job I had just been laid off from. Yet, I stuck it out, was hired permanently, worked hard, got raises, branched into Public Relations/Social Media and moved forward in my career. Don’t let your ego or a sole focus on money deter you from what might be a good thing down the line.

5) Keep learning
When I was laid off, I researched to see if there were any funds, grants or scholarships available to displaced workers for training programs. Turns out there were! One of our local colleges offered 60% off tuition for certain certificate programs. I applied right away and was accepted. I also received a grant for computer classes. It does take time to find, apply and write essays for these programs, but the rewards are well worth it. When you land a new job, see if they offer tuition reimbursement or other training opportunities. This is especially true for marketing and design professionals. Current college students have access to the latest programs and are up on the trends. Don’t be left behind. There are also many free webinars online you can take to keep your skill set up to date.

I’m not going to lie – being laid off was awful and scary. These are normal emotions for that situation. It tests your character. I was lucky to find a new position in the relatively short time that I did. Most unemployed job seekers face a much longer job search in today’s marketplace.

Being laid off taught me to understand what unemployed people go through and how strong I was. It gave me an empathy and understanding that I would not have otherwise had. It’s been almost 15 years, but I will never forget that dark time period in my life. It’s part of the reason why I love my current role here at the Oldcastle Recruiting Office – because I now get to help people on their career and job search journeys every day! – Kyra M.

Trees

“Do not go where the path may lead, go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.” ― Ralph Waldo Emerson

Looking for more job search advice? Check out this post: “How to write a better resume – the Top 10 Tips from our Recruiters”

A version of this post, by our Social Media Specialist, also appears on LinkedIn.

Photo credits: Unsplash – forest, K. Mancine – tunnel

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Oldcastle is North America’s largest manufacturer of building products and materials. With more than 2,000 locations throughout North America, we are in constant pursuit of the next generation of successful decision makers, leaders and problem solvers. Learn more about joining the Oldcastle team HERE.

Follow Oldcastle Careers on: TwitterLinkedIn, Instagram, YouTube, Pinterest and Facebook for jobs and career advice. And, don’t forget to join our NEW Talent Community to receive a monthly e-mail newsletter with expert advice on the job search process.

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How Well Do You Know LinkedIn? Infographic

Looking for more career advice?
Check out this post:
If you were laid off tomorrow, would you be prepared to find a new job?

Thank you for reading!

P.S. If you like our infographic, please share it.

Oldcastle is North America’s largest manufacturer of building products and materials. With more than 2,000 locations throughout North America, we are in constant pursuit of the next generation of successful decision makers, leaders and problem solvers. Learn more about joining the Oldcastle team HERE.

Follow Oldcastle Careers on TwitterLinkedIn, Instagram, YouTube, Pinterest and Facebook for jobs and career advice. And, don’t forget to join our NEW Talent Community to receive a monthly e-mail newsletter with expert advice on the job search process.

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The Road To A Good Interview – Ten Simple Steps To Success – Infographic

  1. Do a trial run to the interview location
  2. Show up early
  3. Put your cell phone away
  4. Be on your best behavior
  5. Greet your interviewer with a firm handshake
  6. Have a list of questions to ask, but don't do all the talking
  7. Don't focus on the money
  8. Get a business card (name/contact info) from everyone you interview with
  9. Send a thank you note after the interview
  10. Celebrate your new job!

Looking for more career advice?
Check out this post:
How to write a better resume – the top 10 tips from our recruiters

Thank you for reading!

P.S. If you like our infographic, please share it.

taglineOldcastle
Oldcastle is North America’s largest manufacturer of building products and materials. With more than 2,000 locations throughout North America, we are in constant pursuit of the next generation of successful decision makers, leaders and problem solvers. Learn more about joining the Oldcastle team HERE.

Follow Oldcastle Careers on Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, YouTube, Pinterest and Facebook for jobs and career advice. And, don’t forget to join our NEW Talent Community to receive a monthly e-mail newsletter with expert advice on the job search process.

Leave a comment

Filed under Careers, Interviewing, Job Search, job search advice, job search tips

Kim Caccamise, Corporate Recruiter, Oldcastle Precast

Linked In Profile PicWhat do you do in your position?
I am a Corporate Recruiter for exempt level positions for our Oldcastle Precast Division. 

When did you join Oldcastle?
May 2015

Where is your job located?
I am physically located in Rochester, New York, but I recruit nationally.

What do you like about working here?
It’s great. First and foremost, the team is fantastic. They are a group of forward thinking, professional yet humble people who have a true passion and are willing to help at any time.  

What are the best parts of your job?
I enjoy getting the opportunity to make a difference and getting into the talent trenches. We are all on a mission, and part of our DNA in our role is to make sure we do not leave any possible stone unturned.

PrecastTeam

Happy hour after work w/the Precast/APG team.

Working with managers in the field has also been excellent. They are all very helpful and accessible, even though they have really busy calendars as well.

How would your co-workers describe you?
I think they would say that I have a pretty even demeanor. I have a sense of humor and am willing to do whatever it takes to get the job done and be a part of the team. Fun fact:  When I sneeze, my co-workers now know to wait until the 5th one before they say “bless you.”

Do you have any funny or interesting work stories to share?
I had to stop at one of my client locations to meet a Senior Manager.  As I walked through the main doors, I immediately caught my foot and tripped on the corner of the no-slip rug, made a ridiculous sound that no human should make, and then proceeded to catch my fall with the coffee of the Vice President who was walking by. I stayed on my feet while he took the fall.   Needless to say, he was who I was supposed to meet.  Good start.

Just for fun, we want to know – what was your first job ever?
One of my first jobs (that ended up lasting for 7 years) was working on Conesus Lake (one of the Finger Lakes in upstate New York) at Camp Stella Maris. A few of those years I worked as a Program Director. 

ChefCLown

Do you have any hobbies?
I love to cook, dance, play any sport (or try to), write and, lately, have successfully completed every American Ninja Warrior obstacle course (in my head).

If you would like, tell us about your family.
My partner and I, and our 2 kids (8 and 10 year old girls ), are very active and have a ton of fun.  We have 2 cats, 2 hamsters and 2 guinea pigs…..apparently we are going for a Noah’s Ark theme.

Connect with me on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kimcaccamise

taglineOldcastle

Oldcastle is North America’s largest manufacturer of building products and materials. With more than 2,000 locations throughout North America, we are in constant pursuit of the next generation of successful decision makers, leaders and problem solvers. Learn more about joining the Oldcastle team HERE.

Follow us on TwitterInstagramLinkedInYouTube, and Facebook for jobs and career advice. And, don’t forget to join our NEW Talent Community to receive a monthly e-mail newsletter with expert advice on the job search process.

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Ever feel like your resume goes into a black hole?

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Filed under Careers, Interviewing, Job Search, job search advice, job search tips, resume, Resumes, Work

If you were laid off tomorrow, would you be prepared to find a new job?

UnsplashSuccess depends upon previous preparation, and without such preparation there is sure to be failure. 
-Confucius

Whether you’ve been at your job two years or twenty, there is always the possibility of being let go. So, what steps can you take to be prepared?

1) Have an updated resume on hand at all times
 A layoff is a traumatic life event. It takes time to process the shock and emotions and start your search. If you have your resume complete, that means you are at least initially prepared for the job search journey. Not only that, if you happen to be a part of a mass layoff, you’ll be one step ahead of your competition. Need some help on starting or updating your resume? Check out this article.

2) Make it a priority to check in on LinkedIn a few times a week.
It doesn’t take much time to post a status update and like or comment on what your connections are up to. Recruiters often see a flurry of activity on LinkedIn from people who have just been let go. It makes sense that you spend more time on LinkedIn when you have the day to job search. BUT, connections are better made before you need them. Networking is a give and take, and desperation never comes off as appealing. Bonus points if you get or give recommendations before you need them.  Note – don’t go overboard with this one. When you’re actually updating your page, keep the privacy settings on so people can’t see what updates you’re making. You don’t want to make your current employer suspicious.

3) Scan the online job postings at least once a week
Make it a habit to know what’s out there. You’ll start to see hiring trends. Are there certain companies who seem to be  on the upswing? The job listings will reflect that. You’ll also see some companies post the same job within the same year. Is this a clue they experience high turnover? If you hadn’t been monitoring the job search sites on a frequent basis, you would never know that position had just recently been filled.

4)  Stay current on local business news 
It doesn’t take much time to scan the business section of the local paper (online or hard copy) or catch the local news to stay informed on what businesses are growing in your community.

5) Commit to one networking event a quarter
Every field/industry has meetings and other events. The event doesn’t have to be networking focused. A training or speaking event can also provide opportunities to meet people. Don’t like to network? Read this article for some networking tips.

6) Start thinking about who you would use for references
While submitting references is usually the last part of the job search process, there are certain applications that require them upfront. Tread carefully on this step. You don’t want to ask anyone from your current job yet. You could approach a boss from a prior position to be one of your references. The point of this step is just to get you thinking about who you could use if needed. This article gives additional advice on making the most of your references.

7) Be smart about that safety cushion
The common sentiment is to have 6 months of readily available cash for emergencies. A layoff clearly counts as an emergency. You may or may not get a severance package, and unemployment only goes so far. Yes, the discipline and sacrifice to have this monetary reserve is not easy. Child rearing expenses, car/home repairs and life necessities come first. Start by setting aside twenty dollars  a week. Small amounts add up over time. Here’s an article on creating a financial safety net if you need a little nudge in the right direction.

Being job search ready at all times does not really take that much additional time or effort. While you may be fortunate enough to never experience a layoff,  this proactive approach will give you peace of mind and the tools you need to land on your feet.

Photo credit: Unsplash

This post, by our Social Media Specialist, originally appeared on LinkedIn.

P.S. Looking for more career advice? Check out this post: How To Write A Better Resume: The Top 10 Tips From Our Recruiters.

taglineOldcastle

Oldcastle is North America’s largest manufacturer of building products and materials. With more than 2,000 locations throughout North America, we are in constant pursuit of the next generation of successful decision makers, leaders and problem solvers. Learn more about joining the Oldcastle team HERE.

Follow Oldcastle Careers on Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, YouTube, Pinterest and Facebook for jobs and career advice. And, don’t forget to join our NEW Talent Community to receive a monthly e-mail newsletter with expert advice on the job search process.

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Filed under Careers, Interviewing, Job Search, job search advice, job search tips, LinkedIn Advice, resume, Resumes

Joel Burris, Corporate Recruiter, Allied Building Products

JoelBurrisWhat do you do in your position?
I am a Corporate Recruiter. I find highly qualified and skilled employees to help our company grow.

When did you join Oldcastle? December, 2014

Where is your job located?
I am physically located Rochester NY, but recruit for positions all over the nation!

What do you like about working here?
The candidates I get to speak to on a daily basis.

What are the best parts of your job?
Helping someone further their career or get started on a path for a career.

How would your co-workers describe you?
Outgoing, opinionated and LOUD.

Just for fun, we want to know – what was your first job ever?
I did a lot of yard work and landscaping when I was younger, but my first ever employer was a grocery store.

If you would like, tell us about your family. I am married with two kids – 3 and 1. So yes, I have my hands full! My daughter is going on 3, and my son is turning 1 in August.  I feel bad for him. His big sister is full of energy, and he is already learning to be tough due to her excessive enthusiasm when playing with him. He should be returning the favor shortly, as he is growing fast and rapidly catching up to her.

Do you have any hobbies?
I like to hunt, fish and do yard work. I love NASCAR and anything with a motor and wheels. I also like firearms, sports, camping, and sitting on the couch and snacking while watching Disney JR with the kids.

Do you have any funny or interesting work stories to share?
I have a pretty colorful background that has allowed me to do a lot of traveling. I have visited approximately 25 states, including Alaska twice. I have also been to 4 different countries and Chile twice.  The most exciting job I have had was on a NASCAR race team. While on the team, I did everything from changing the tires on a pit stop to driving the Big Rig.
Nascar

joel armyComing in closely behind as far as jobs go was defending our country as a US Army Soldier. I worked as a Crew Chief on a helicopter. If I can’t be behind the wheel or in a car, the next best thing is flying in a helicopter.

Currently, I get to actively recruit military veterans, and have also had the chance to make recruitment videos for transitioning military. 

Connect with me on LinkedIn: Joel Burris

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Oldcastle is North America’s largest manufacturer of building products and materials. With more than 2,000 locations throughout North America, we are in constant pursuit of the next generation of successful decision makers, leaders and problem solvers. Learn more about joining the Oldcastle team HERE.

Follow us on TwitterInstagramLinkedInYouTube, and Facebook for jobs and career advice. And, don’t forget to join our NEW Talent Community to receive a monthly e-mail newsletter with expert advice on the job search process.

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Blog Your Way To A Better Job

bookThe Benefits of LinkedIn Long Form Publishing
You’ve updated your LinkedIn profile, added all the connections you can, and you’re ready to find that new job. Now what? LinkedIn Long Form Publishing is a new way to stand out on LinkedIn, gain exposure and network.

What is it?
LinkedIn allows users to write and publish posts as part of their profile. Publishing on LinkedIn used to only be available for the select few. Now, anyone, in any industry, can self publish a blog post.

Why should I write a post?
1) It’s a great way to get your name out there.
Every time you publish a post, not only does it show up as a status, it shows up in the top hand right corner to ALL your connections – notifying them that you have added a post. It also appears as part of your profile.

2) If your post gets picked up by “Pulse,” the exposure can be huge. Pulse features business and career related news. Thousands of people follow Pulse categories. Instead of just your connections seeing the post, it will potentially be seen by followers of that category. MothersDayPostFor example, this post on Mother’s Day was picked up and featured in the “Best Advice” category on LinkedIn Pulse. As a result, this post received 1,523 views, 120 likes and 14 comments. Not bad for someone who has less than 300 connections.

In addition, if your post is picked up, you can also gain followers. LinkedIn followers are different than connections. Like connections, these are people who will receive a notification every time you publish a new post. However, the difference is – followers only see your posts. They cannot see the rest of your news feed or connections.

 4) Writing a post shows off commitment to your career and helping others.  By choosing to publish on LinkedIn, you’re showing initiative. Let’s face it – not everyone is going to spend the time and effort to do this.

5) It’s a relatively easy way to build a portfolio. For writers, it’s a great, FREE place to showcase your work online without starting a separate blog, learning a different platform or getting your own web page. For everyone else, it’s still a great way to have something to show potential employers – even if you’re not in the communications field.

6) Anyone, in any industry can showcase industry knowledge/expertise
Whether you’re a manager, mechanic or musician, everyone has something of value to contribute. By allowing users to publish on LinkedIn, it levels the playing field. You may not be a CEO or President of a company, but that does not mean you don’t add value. For aspiring entrepreneurs and the unemployed, the mere act of blogging can be a real confidence builder.

Convinced? If so, let’s get started!

HOW TO PUBLISH ON LINKEDIN
publish

1) Go to your LinkedIn Profile and click on “Publish a Post.”
A template will then appear where you can start typing.
NewPostDraft

2) Pick a topic. Give some thought to this. Write about what you know. The best posts are interesting, informative and give a unique spin on things. Write about what people can relate to. If you’re an expert on a niche topic, write about that. Tie your post in to a holiday or trend in your field. Have a strong opinion on the latest news? Think of an angle that’s different from the prevailing point of view. Think outside of the box! Controversy can be ok – within reason. You want to be seen as a smart, well informed professional.

3) Start writing! This is the fun part. Let your thoughts flow. Remember, when writing, keep it easy to read. Beak up your text with a numbered or bulleted list. The publishing platform is pretty intuitive once you get the hang of it. You can bold, add images, links, even embed videos. Think about what you would want to see in a post and pattern yours after that.

4) Find the right image. Images are important! They will draw the reader in. More readers means more views. Find a compelling image that goes along with your post. There are many free sources online for images or take one yourself. Make sure to always attribute who took the photo. There is a spot to add the source of your image that will appear in the upper left hand corner once you add your image. Pay attention to the recommended size of the image and try to duplicate it or at least come close.

tags5) Add tags, edit and publish!
The LinkedIn platform is similar to WordPress and other self publishing platforms. You can save your draft and publish when ready. Don’t forget to add tags. Tags are categories and terms that make it easier for people to find your post. Once you start typing a word or term (take the term “job search” for example), LinkedIn will suggest similar popular words/terms to use. Make a mistake or see a typo after you publish your post? No worries, you can always go back, edit and update.

How long should my post be? That depends. Many say shorter is better. Some topics deserve more text. Focus first on quality content formatted in an easy to read way.

Writing a post on LinkedIn is not just for writers or marketing/communication professionals. If you’re an active job seeker (or even if you’re not), writing a few posts can help you in your career.

So, there you have it! Give LinkedIn Long Form Publishing a try. Done correctly, it can only enhance and complement your job search and career plans.

P.S. Don’t forget to share your published post on social media. There are share buttons right by the title of your post. Oh, and if you liked this post, please share it!

Looking for more career advice? Check out our post on How To Write A Better Resume – the Top 10 Tips From Our Recruiters.

This post, by our Social Media Specialist, also appears on LinkedIn.

Photo credit: Luis Llerena, Unsplash

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Oldcastle is North America’s largest manufacturer of building products and materials. With more than 2,000 locations throughout North America, we are in constant pursuit of the next generation of successful decision makers, leaders and problem solvers. Learn more about joining the Oldcastle team HERE.

Follow Oldcastle Careers on Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, YouTube, Pinterest and Facebook for jobs and career advice. And, don’t forget to join our NEW Talent Community to receive a monthly e-mail newsletter with expert advice on the job search process.

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Filed under Careers, Job Search, job search advice, LinkedIn Advice

4 Easy Action Steps for Veterans Transitioning To Civilian Jobs

hardhatFirst off, thank  you for your service to this country! It takes a special person to serve. As a veteran, you bring many valuable qualities that employers desire in the workplace. However, sometimes these qualities and skills can be lost in translation. If employers can’t find you, they can’t hire you!

1) Make sure that you have a LinkedIn profile (and that it’s up-to-date)
LinkedIn is becoming increasingly important for everyone in their job search. Recruiters rely on it heavily, and it’s the first place an employer will go to do more research about you. Joel Burris, a former US Army Service Member who now works as a Corporate Recruiter for Allied Building Products, offers this advice:

2) Re-do your resume for a civilian audience
There are a lot of terms, jargon and codes that are familiar to you, but will not be familiar to the person reading your resume. A former veteran will know the terms, but the odds of that person reading your resume are slim. The goal of your resume is to highlight accomplishments. You have to translate what you did in the military to terms that a non military person will understand. There are Military Translators that can help. Here’s one: http://www.military.com/veteran-jobs/skills-translator/

Along the same lines, your LinkedIn profile should be civilian friendly. Joel offers additional advice on that in the short clip below.

3) Be “At ease” in the interview
It may come naturally to say “Yes, sir,” but you do not have to be that formal in the interview process. Interviews are professional, but the trend now is for a more conversational back and forth.

4) Understand that a civilian carer path is more fluid
In the private sector, the hierarchy is not as strict or as set in place as the military. While there can be set paths for rising up in an organization, things in the corporate sector operate differently and on a different timetable. In addition, once you land the job, know that navigating corporate culture is going to take some getting used to.  The chain of command, how people act, the environment and expectations will be different from what you’re familiar with.

One Last Thought
Never forget that you are valued! Veterans ARE sought after for civilian jobs due to their dedication, commitment, adaptability and many other strengths. There are many veteran-friendly companies that want to hire veterans. And yes, we are definitely one of those companies! Capitalize on your attributes from your military service, follow the advice in this post and you will be well on your way to finding your next job and career.

Know another veteran looking for a job? Please share this post with them.

Thank you for reading!

P.S. Looking for more career advice? Follow our Resources For Veterans Board on Pinterest.

This post, by our Social Media Specialist, also appears on LinkedIn.

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Oldcastle is North America’s largest manufacturer of building products and materials. With more than 2,000 locations throughout North America, we are in constant pursuit of the next generation of successful decision makers, leaders and problem solvers. Learn more about joining the Oldcastle team HERE.

Follow Oldcastle Careers on Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, YouTube, Pinterest and Facebook for jobs and career advice. And, don’t forget to join our NEW Talent Community to receive a monthly e-mail newsletter with expert advice on the job search process.

 

 

 

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Filed under Careers, Interviewing, Job Search, job search advice, job search tips, Resumes, Veteran Job Search

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