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Step it Up! 7 Ideas To Move Your Job Search Forward This Year

progress1One of our company divisions recently sponsored a Fitbit competition. Is there any correlation between challenging ourselves physically and the mental stamina it takes to find a new job? One of the challenge participants shares lessons learned and tips to help you on your own job search journey.

1) Don’t underestimate yourself
Our thoughts can often limit our behaviors. When I first started the challenge, I had my doubts on how I would do. While I am competitive (for some things), I’m also realistic. I have a sedentary desk job. How was I going to increase my activity enough to counteract that? How was I going to compete against other employees who had more active construction jobs at my company? The same self limiting thoughts may occur to you when you embark on a job search. How long is this going to take? How can I compete against others with more experience or a better background?

Here’s the thing – there will always be people with more experience, better odds and more advantages in the game – whether it’s for a contest or a job. You can’t sell yourself short before the challenge or job search journey begins. You just have to start.

StepIntoSpring

2) Silence your inner critic
Are you guilty of negative self talk? It’s hard to break the self destructive habit of thinking of everything that could go wrong. In a job search or interview situation, this can destroy your confidence. You can’t let the critic win! Even silly visuals like imagining a stop sign when that bad chatter comes into your head can help. A motto, mantra or inspirational quote can also be helpful. I constantly told myself to “just keep going.”

3) Stop comparing yourself to others
This one is hard. Fitbit has an online leaderboard where you can see how you rank on a daily and weekly basis. It’s fine to know where other people stand, but it can also make you crazy. In the job search, there are obviously other people interviewing. You can’t change that reality, but you can prepare yourself to do the best you can. Spend extra time researching the company, revising your resume and practicing your interview skills.

watch4) Get a strategy

My strategy was to increase my activity and duration weekly. I wasn’t going to increase it all at once that first week, because then my competition would see that and keep increasing theirs. Slow and steady – try to be the underdog, below the radar. In your job search, you want to be selective. Set up a schedule of job search activities with target dates. Use an excel spreadsheet if that helps. Target employers and jobs, customize your resume and cover letter and have goals. You can’t ultimately control what the employer decides, but you can control how you handle the process.

5) Just start doing it and KEEP GOING – no matter what
The toughest part of the Fitbit challenge was the daily grind. It was exhausting. Running in the cold, wind and rain – it was less than ideal. There were points where my feet and toes felt numb. Honestly, I was ready to bail by the end of day three. Fitting in time to workout 3x a day during the week and more on weekends was tiresome. It also left me no time to do much of anything else – for an entire month. The job search game is also draining – maybe not as much physically, but definitely mentally. Get a support system that can cheer you on. For me, it was others in the contest. Do you know other job seekers? Find your tribe so you can bounce ideas off them. Having others who can relate to what you are going through will get you through the bad times and makes celebrating the wins even better.

6) Consistency is key
This one holds true in almost every area of life. I had one “low” step day during the contest. I certainly didn’t throw in the towel. I just upped my game to counteract it. It averages out over the duration. It’s the day to day efforts that will pay off in the end. You can’t let anything veer you off course. There was another time (mid challenge) that I walked out to my car and discovered that I had a flat tire. Oh no! How was I going to get my steps in? I needed to get home and get on my treadmill. Sadly, this was my first thought. But, for any obstacle, there is a solution. I called AAA and, while I waited the two hours (!) for them to arrive, I did laps in the parking lot. It wasn’t ideal, but it worked.
If you don’t land one job, there will always be another one to apply to. You won’t get a job in a day. It’s the culmination of weeks and months of effort to win the coveted prize. Getting a job takes dedication, commitment and consistent, concerted effort over time.
7) Finish strong

By the end of week four, I was over it. My coworkers were over hearing me talk about it. I just wanted my life back. I did not want to walk, run, jump or do a thing. However, that mental and physical exhaustion wasn’t going to beat me. You can’t let the discouragement and ups and downs of the job search get to you either. If you keep at it, you will prevail. When you start something, you finish it. I dug deep and kept going, eventually upping my daily steps from 30k, to 40k, then 50k and finally 60k+ on that last day (over 24 miles). Yes, it took til the final hour of the final day (11:40 pm to be exact). But, at least I knew that I gave it my all. There is satisfaction in a job well done – whether that be a contest like this or your job search. You can do this – keep going.

Photo Credit: Allied Building Products

Want to learn more about working for Oldcastle?
Visit us at Oldcastle Careers.

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Oldcastle is North America’s largest manufacturer of building products and materials. With more than 2,000 locations throughout North America, we are in constant pursuit of the next generation of successful decision makers, leaders and problem solvers. Learn more about joining the Oldcastle team HERE.

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5 Ways to Love Your Job Search Again

heart
No one really “loves” the job search, but in the spirit of Valentine’s Day this month, we’re hoping to show you how you can at least enjoy the journey more.

1) Expect Ups and Downs As a Part of the Process

Not only does the job search take time, rejection is inevitable at times. Just like you don’t go on one date and find true love immediately, you have to endure multiple interviews and ‘no’s’ before you get to that all important yes.

2) Don’t minimize how life changing and stressful the search can be

Have you ever heard of the Holmes-Rahe Life Stress Inventory? This is a questionnaire developed in the late 1960’s that identifies major stressful life events. Many of them are job related, including: changing to a different line of work, promotions, demotions, being fired, a change in work responsibilities and retirement. Work is a big part of our life and can easily consume our thoughts and behaviors negatively if we let it. Be aware of what a big deal it is to be be actively looking for work. However, don’t let this paralyze your search. Always keep moving forward. Your job search journey is not just the practical/mechanical part of applying and interviewing. It is interwoven with a roller coaster of emotions as well as your comfort level with change, trying new things, meeting new people and adjusting to a new environment and schedule.

3) Organization and persistence go hand in hand

Successful job seekers track their job seeking activities – which companies they’re interested in, what jobs they’ve applied to and how much time they devote to their search. They keep at it, knowing that the time spent will pay off in the end. Using our love scenario as comparison, think of that stressed out bride. She knows that planning her wedding and getting in shape for the big day is not going to happen overnight (or successfully) unless she’s focused, mindful of her schedule and determined. The beauty of all this tenacity is that worry melts away once you land your job (and, for the bride-to-be, when she’s walking down that aisle).

4) Remember the end game

Visualization can be a great motivator. Instead of focusing on all that you “need” to do, focus on what you will gain.

Change the need to a want. You don’t “need” to find a job, you “want” a new, exciting opportunity.

Take it one step further and imagine how awesome and proud you will feel on that first day of your new job (and on the day you get that first paycheck!).

5) Show your support system some love

A job seeker does not exist in a vacuum. It takes a group effort. Your job search tribe consists of family, friends, current/former coworkers and references. You need these people – for everything from mock interviews, to advice to emotional support. Don’t underestimate their importance. Make sure gratitude and appreciation come into play. There will be a time when you can be there for them as well.

Embracing a better, more loving attitude as you embark on your job search will make the entire process easier and more enjoyable.

Photo credit: DepositPhotos

A version of this post, by our Social Media Specialist, also appears on LinkedIn.

Want to learn more about working for Oldcastle?
Visit us at Oldcastle Careers.

taglineOldcastle

Oldcastle is North America’s largest manufacturer of building products and materials. With more than 2,000 locations throughout North America, we are in constant pursuit of the next generation of successful decision makers, leaders and problem solvers. Learn more about joining the Oldcastle team HERE.

Follow us!  TwitterInstagramLinkedInYouTube, and Facebook for jobs and career advice.

 

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Are You Too Scared To Look For A New Job?

grinningpumpkin

Listen, we get it. It can be hard to to put yourself out there. Let’s address some common job search fears and how you can move past them.

  1. The Fear of Change
    This is a big one. Even if you’re in a toxic work environment, leaving to start a new job is inherently stressful. All big moves are stressful – even good ones – like getting married, buying a house, going away to school, etc. Accept that leaving the comfort zone of your current position is going to cause emotional discomfort. This is part of the process. Not feeling at least a little apprehension would be more atypical.

“Overcoming what frightens you the most strengthens you the most.” -M.Dhliayo

  1. Procrastination Nation
    It’s so easy to keep postponing your job search.” Oh, I’ll wait until after the holidays, after the kids get a little older, after ‘INSERT YOUR EXCUSE HERE’. Don’t do it. Life moves quickly, and, before you know it, we’ll be in the midst of the new year. Combat this obstacle by charting out your job search plan now. It can be as simple as drafting and following a plan: October – work on resume and LinkedIn page for a half hour on Wednesday and Thursday nights, search for jobs for a half hour on Monday and Tuesday nights, November – attend one networking event, get references lined up. You get the idea…
  2. Not understanding the process 
    If you haven’t searched for a job for awhile (or even if you have), you’ll soon realize that the process itself has changed. Completing online applications is commonplace. These ATS (Applicant Tracking Systems) have their own set of rules. It’s imperative that you format your resume with keywords to increase your chances of the system making a match. Along the same lines though, good old fashioned job search rules still apply. You need to emphasize your accomplishments on your resume, as well as in an interview. The competition has never been fiercer, but knowing how to position yourself appropriately is half the battle.
  3. Thinking The Grass ISN’T Greener
    If you’ve ever left one bad job for another one, you may resist making a change again. However, if you don’t take a chance, you’ll never know! Yes, there is always the chance the next job may not live up to its potential. But, this is where your research comes in. Make sure to thoroughly research the company as best you can before you accept the offer.
    Besides perusing all their social media, look to see if you have any mutual connections or friends who know people who work there. ASK probing questions – for instance – What would people say is the best and worst thing about working here? If you could improve something in the office, what would it be?  LOOK for clues when you’re at the interview. Do people seem engaged and energetic or appear apathetic? What you hear (or don’t hear), see (or don’t see), can all be very telling. Be a detective so you don’t get burned.

At the end of the day, it’s a personal decision whether you make the decision to stay or to go. As they say though, no risk, no rewards. Fight through your fears and go for that new job!

Looking for more job search advice?
Join our Talent Community today HERE! You’ll receive receive a monthly e-newsletter with job search advice written by our own staff of recruiters and experts.To see past issues, check out our Newsletter Archive.

Want to learn more about working for Oldcastle?
Visit us at Oldcastle Careers.

Photo Credit: DepositPhotos

A version of this post, by our Social Media Specialist, also appears on LinkedIn.

taglineOldcastle

Oldcastle is North America’s largest manufacturer of building products and materials. With more than 2,000 locations throughout North America, we are in constant pursuit of the next generation of successful decision makers, leaders and problem solvers. Learn more about joining the Oldcastle team HERE.

Follow us!  TwitterInstagramLinkedInYouTube, and Facebook for jobs and career advice.

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Are You In A Job Search Drought?

DroughtMany parts of the country have experienced drought like conditions this Summer. Feel like the search for your dream job has run dry? If your job search has slowed to a trickle, here are five strategies to get it flowing forward again.

1. Track where you are
Meteorologists reporting on the weather are quick to tell us how many 90+ degree days we’ve had and how many are on the horizon. Do you know how many jobs you’ve applied to, how many calls you’ve made and where you stand in terms of lining up references? It helps to track, monitor and review your current results so you can start adjusting them. Start by creating a simple spreadsheet in Excel to track your job search activities or use a free site like JibberJobber to keep tabs on applications submitted, contacts, companies, etc.

2. Make adjustments
During a drought, water and energy conservation rules are often in effect. While you may want to water your lawn, you can’t. In the job search, you may have your eye on target companies that just aren’t hiring right now. In that case, it’s time to move to Plan B. Start researching other companies. There could be smaller organizations out there that offer great opportunities. Don’t fixate on just one type of company or even industry.

3. Bust through that stationary front.
Still seeing and applying for the same few positions? Sometimes candidates get in a rut, and search for the same job titles and avoid networking on LinkedIn, joining LinkedIn groups or not customizing their resume for each job. Big mistake!

Amy Keenan PictureIt could be that your search string is too stationary – like  that stationary weather front. If the same positions keep popping up, you need to change what you’re searching for. It’s very important to be flexible and be willing to try something new. The goal is to change the climate of your approach (resume, interview skills, etc.) from cold to hot!
– Amy Keenan,Corporate Recruiter for Allied Building Products  and a former weather forecaster 

4. Set up advisories
We’ve all received weather alerts, but did you know that on some job search sites, you can input your search criteria and receive notifications about new positions? While this should not be the only way you search for jobs, it is an easy way to make sure you don’t miss out on opportunities.

5. Know that this dry spell is only temporary
It’s easy to get tunnel vision and think that the heat will never end, your lawn will remain brown forever and that you’ll never get called in for another interview. However, that’s simply not true! Just as the rain will fall one day again soon, you will get interviews and you will land a job. If you give up now or adopt a defeatist attitude however, that will show through in your efforts. Don’t let apathy or inertia into your life! Keep researching companies and applying for positions. Employers sense desperation. Putting less effort/energy shows and, even worse, it’s only going to prolong your job search that much longer.

If you follow these tips, the drought should end and you will be flooded with opportunities! – Amy Keenan

P.S. If this post helped you, or you think it can help others, please share it.

Looking for more job search advice?
Join our Talent Community today HERE! You’ll receive receive a monthly e-newsletter with job search advice written by our own staff of recruiters and experts.To see past issues, check out our Newsletter Archive.

Want to learn more about working for Oldcastle?
Visit us at Oldcastle Careers.

Photo Credit: Brad Helmink, Unsplash

taglineOldcastle

Oldcastle is North America’s largest manufacturer of building products and materials. With more than 2,000 locations throughout North America, we are in constant pursuit of the next generation of successful decision makers, leaders and problem solvers. Learn more about joining the Oldcastle team HERE.

Follow us!  TwitterInstagramLinkedInYouTube, and Facebook for jobs and career advice.

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Are You An Unlucky Job Seeker?

Clovers.jpg

If you’ve been looking for a job for awhile, you may be feeling discouraged. When is it going to be MY turn? The goal of any successful job search is to stack the odds in your favor, so you are the ‘lucky one’ chosen. Ask yourself these questions and be honest about the answers. They can reveal areas to improve upon in your overall job search strategy.

  1. Are you doing your due diligence?
    You may have read stories that reveal how quite a few people spend more time planning for a vacation than they do for their retirement. No surprise there – it’s fun to plan a vacation. Retirement planning or job searching – not so much. Nevertheless, it’s important to remain focused and dedicate yourself to important, not so fun things – like your job search. This means customizing every cover letter and resume to the job, researching employers prior to an interview, getting/prepping the right references, calling recruiters back and going outside your comfort zone when it comes to proactively networking.
  2. Has your confidence, attitude and energy changed since you started searching?
    It’s completely understandable that your enthusiasm for the process has taken a hit, especially after more time goes by. However, this is not the time to show it. Even if you don’t feel energized and optimistic, you have to act like you are. Eating properly, getting exercise and creating a good support system (family/friends/fellow job seekers) can help boost your mood too.
  3. Do you let rejection (i.e. not hearing back from an application, after an interview, etc.) get you down?
    It’s ok and normal to feel disappointed. The job search can be impersonal, unfair and frustrating. However, wallowing is your enemy. Allow yourself time to be mad or sad and then move on! Think of the job search like speed dating. You’re going from interview to interview, just like you would be going from date to date. Not every date results in a relationship, and not every interview results in a job.

    Going through the interview process makes you better at interviewing. Don’t think of it as a waste of time – think of it as practice!

Progress and forward movement/momentum in the job search isn’t dependent on luck. It takes time and continual effort. Don’t give up. It may take longer than you had hoped for, but the right job is out there for you. And, always remember- the employer is the lucky one for making the decision to hire you.

Looking for more career advice? Check out this post:
Reference Reality – 7 Things You Should Know

P.S. If this post helped you or you think it can help others, please share.

Thank you for reading!

Photo credit: Quentin Ray: Unsplash

A version of this post, by our Social Media Specialist, also appears on LinkedIn.

taglineOldcastle

Oldcastle is North America’s largest manufacturer of building products and materials. With more than 2,000 locations throughout North America, we are in constant pursuit of the next generation of successful decision makers, leaders and problem solvers. Learn more about joining the Oldcastle team HERE.

Follow us for jobs and career advice:
Twitter
LinkedIn
Instagram
YouTube
Facebook
Pinterest

Also, don’t forget to join our Talent Community to receive a monthly e-mail newsletter with expert advice on the job search process.

 

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6 Job Search Tricks To Love

Stone pavement texture with a red heart

red

  1. Looking for an email address?
    Here’s a site that will help: Email Hunter You won’t find every email here, but it can be helpful to track down some elusive email addresses.
  2. Make your LinkedIn introduction matter. Many people, before they apply to a job, head to LinkedIn to see if they have any connections who are connected to people at that company. They then ask for an introduction (see steps for how to do that HERE). To make your request stand out, put some thought into what you say and personalize it a bit more. Here’s an example:
    Hi [your connection’s name],
    How are you? Hoping things are going well for you this year. It’s been quite the Winter hasn’t it? I notice that you are connected to Sam Smith, who is the VP of Marketing for Acme Corp. I saw that Acme has a Marketing Specialist position listed on their website. It looks really interesting, and I would love to find out more about the job. Would you mind introducing me? I know how busy you get this time of year, so I wrote up a little blurb to pass along to make it easier. Oh, and I also wanted to share this article I found – thought you might find it interesting. 
  3. Message someone on LinkedIn even if they aren’t your connection.
    If you share a mutual group, you can contact them without being connected.
  4. Always return a recruiter’s call.
    They aren’t there to harass you. Good recruiters want to build a relationship with you to find the right fit for their company or agency.
  5. Don’t hesitate to reach out to a recruiter about a job you see.
    Even if the opening isn’t a fit, one down the line might be. The recruiter will have the “inside scoop” on the job.

    “Job descriptions can be vague and don’t tell the whole story, says Corporate Recruiter Deonna Campbell. “Having a brief conversation with the recruiter can clear up any questions you may have and can expand on what the job entails. Even if you aren’t interested in this particular opportunity, getting more information might help someone you know.”

  6. Start a “kudos” folder. This is a folder (email or paper) with any documents or emails that you get that you can use down the line to further your case during a performance review, for getting a raise, updating your resume or at an interview. Suggested items to be included: a congratulatory email from your boss about successful completion of a project, a list of webinars or classes you have attended in your field, statistics from work projects, etc. It’s better to save these items as you get them instead of having to scramble and backtrack.

Bonus tip– Be proactive and start using  Twitter to build up your connections. Someone may not accept your connection request on LinkedIn, but you can always follow them on Twitter. Follow target companies/people and make sure to interact (retweet, reply and like) with them before you need a job. This is an easy, low pressure way to build up your network.
Thanks
* Just for fun * Check out this site where you can make your own personalized virtual candy heart. Happy Valentine’s Day!

A version of this post, by our Social Media Specialist, also appears on LinkedIn.

taglineOldcastle

Oldcastle is North America’s largest manufacturer of building products and materials. With more than 2,000 locations throughout North America, we are in constant pursuit of the next generation of successful decision makers, leaders and problem solvers. Learn more about joining the Oldcastle team HERE.

Follow us for jobs and career advice:
Twitter
LinkedIn
Instagram
YouTube
Facebook
Pinterest

Also, don’t forget to join our Talent Community to receive a monthly e-mail newsletter with expert advice on the job search process.

 

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4 Easy Ways To Help The Jobseeker In Your Life

1) Show interest
When a job seeker is feeling discouraged or “less than,” a simple question about how they are doing with their search can make a big difference.  Don’t dismiss or minimize their progress. Get across that you know that they are more than their occupation/employment status.

2) Offer assistance, not advice (unless asked)
It’s a fine line between being helpful and being aggressive. You may have great job search suggestions to offer, but if they are presented in a way that is perceived as being pushy, they won’t be taken into consideration. Pressuring someone never works. For spouses – this isn’t to say you can’t say something if they are obviously slacking, but find out first WHY they are not focusing on their search and make a plan together going forward. For friends – besides being there to listen, communicate to them that you care, have had success with a certain resume format in the past (for example) and are there to lend a hand.

3) Play a part in their search
This can take many forms:
– help with a mock interview or phone screen – you ask the questions
– proofread their resume/cover letter
– see if you have any social media connections at their target company

4) Provide a break 
Make this time a “no job search talk” zone. Seek out low cost activities:
– take a walk
– rent a funny movie
– play a board game
– try a new recipe
– go to the library

While these may seem like common sense tips, it can be easy to overlook the obvious – especially during such a stressful time. Looking for a job is an emotional journey for everyone – not just the job seeker. It impacts the spouse/partner, children, siblings, friends, and so on down the line.

What about you? Have you ever helped a loved one during their job search? What worked? What didn’t?

Looking for more job search advice? Check out this post: 4 Ways To Rise Above Job Search Rejection.

A version of this post originally appeared on LinkedIn.

Photo credit: mrpruen at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

taglineOldcastle

Oldcastle is North America’s largest manufacturer of building products and materials. With more than 2,000 locations throughout North America, we are in constant pursuit of the next generation of successful decision makers, leaders and problem solvers. Learn more about joining the Oldcastle team HERE.

Follow us for jobs and career advice:
Twitter
LinkedIn
Instagram
YouTube
Facebook
Pinterest

Also, don’t forget to join our Talent Community to receive a monthly e-mail newsletter with expert advice on the job search process.

Leave a comment

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Why The Job Search Sometimes Stinks, And What You Can Do About It

Pepe

“Smile” says Pepe, it will get better!

Are you a discouraged  job seeker? We understand. The job search can be a grind. Here are 7 suggestions that will make the process a little bit easier.

  1. Reach out to others going through the same thing.
    As much as family members and friends try, unless they are unemployed or unhappily employed and desperately looking, it’s only natural that they can’t truly understand what you’re going through. Surround yourself with fellow job seekers. You can find job search groups at your local library, Dept. of Labor Service Centers as well as online. Have you ever tried a Twitter Chat? Give one a try to get expert advice from career counselors, resume writers and recruiters. Free job search help is only a click away. Check out this POST if you need help on how to participate in a chat.
  2. Be kind to yourself.
    Beating yourself up with self defeating thoughts like “I’ll never get this job” or “Why is this so hard?” or “What did I do to deserve this?” is counterproductive. Layoffs happen, and good people lose their jobs all the time. It’s not a badge of shame and you should not wear it as such.
  3. Schedule in time for non job search activity.
    While looking for a job should be your full time job, you also need time to recharge. Schedule time for a walk, watch a funny movie, read a book or magazine. You need that distraction.
  4. Remember, your job does not define you.
    In your heart, you know that’s true. Your resume, elevator speech and interview answers are all a part of the PROCESS, not the PERSON. This distinction matters. Even if you landed the job of your dreams today, you are still the same person you were yesterday.
  5. Be your own career counselor.
    Step outside your situation and pretend that you were helping someone in the same boat. What advice would you give them? If you’re slacking or not taking advantage of some of the resources out there, it’s time to step it up.
  6. Acknowledge that luck, timing & the economy will play a role.
    There are are many factors that play a role in getting a job. Many are out of your control. However, that does not mean that you should give up or settle for less than what you deserve.
  7. Start spreading the word.
    Some people keep their search a secret. Some of this can be due to the shame discussed in the second suggestion above. Yet, the more people who know that you’re looking for a job, the better off you are. Post on all your social media that you’re looking for work. Keep it simple. Here’s a sample status post:
    “Hi, I’m in the market for a new job in the (Fill in your field here). Anyone have any leads? I would really appreciate it. Thanks in advance and have a great day!”  Or, write something similar to the suggested text above. The point is – everyone you meet, see or talk to (in person and online) can be a source for you (or know someone who might be). Don’t discount who you know! Who THEY know can mean the difference between getting a job or remaining stuck in your search.

It takes a lot of energy and commitment to embark on a job search. Hopefully, this renewed approach will keep you motivated and moving forward. If you have your own tips to share, let us know. We would love to hear them. Good luck and stay strong!

Looking for more job search advice? Check out this post: Ever Feel Like Your Resume Goes Into A Black Hole?

taglineOldcastle

Oldcastle is North America’s largest manufacturer of building products and materials. With more than 2,000 locations throughout North America, we are in constant pursuit of the next generation of successful decision makers, leaders and problem solvers. Learn more about joining the Oldcastle team HERE.

Follow us for jobs and career advice:
Twitter
LinkedIn
Instagram
YouTube
Facebook
Pinterest

Also, don’t forget to join our Talent Community to receive a monthly e-mail newsletter with expert advice on the job search process.

 

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Ever feel like your resume goes into a black hole?

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Filed under Careers, Interviewing, Job Search, job search advice, job search tips, resume, Resumes, Work

4 Surprising Things A Job Seeker Might Not Know

4 Surprising Things A Job Seeker Might Not Know

 

Like this Infographic? Please share it.
Want to visit our careers page? Simply click anywhere on the image.

Looking for more career advice?
Check out this post on Ways To Rise Above Job Search Rejection.

Thank you for reading!

taglineOldcastle

Oldcastle is North America’s largest manufacturer of building products and materials. With more than 2,000 locations throughout North America, we are in constant pursuit of the next generation of successful decision makers, leaders and problem solvers. Learn more about joining the Oldcastle team HERE.

Follow Oldcastle Careers on Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, YouTube, Pinterest and Facebook for jobs and career advice. And, don’t forget to join our NEW Talent Community to receive a monthly e-mail newsletter with expert advice on the job search process.

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